E - Hifybe, early experiments with surface piercing aft foil & two front foils
INTERNATIONAL HYDROFOIL SOCIETY'S ALBUMS > E - Hifybe, early experiments with surface piercing aft foil & two front foils
This is an early version of the High Flying Banana, Hifybe. This served as a testbed for the trials of several components and configurations.

Two versions of the front foil are shown. One is surface piercing with an upper and a lower component.

The other is a submerged version that provides for manual changing of the angle of attack, AOA. This of course changes the lift and allows the pilot to respond quickly to changes in bow height and pitch. The center of pivot was place low to reduce the stick pressure and minimize the effort required to fly the bow.

Neither version performed satisfactorily.

The rear foil supports about 80% of the weight and it was assigned the task of roll stability. Coupling the roll stability with the main lifting foil is a good thing. But the surface piercing foil tends to ventilate, and the configuration may not be wide enough to be sufficiently effective.

Some radical configuration changes were played with. The rigg was turned around so that the surfaced-piercing V foil was mounted up front and the manual AOA small submerged foil was mounted at the stern. The appearance while flying could be attractive because the bow extended way forward of the front foil giving a cantilever look. But the problems with the surface-piercing main foil persisted and manual control of height and pitch is a game of skill that is fatiguing and requires concentration. This type of pitch/height control is only effective at low speeds, in my experience, regardless of whether the pitch/height control is at the bow or the stern.

Later versions of Hifybe with a submerged rear foil with ailerons coupled with a automatic height-finding front foil was successful, and can be seen in a later album and on Youtube: go to 'Ray Vellinga' channel and select the appropriate thumbnail.

Hifybe and its photos by Ray Vellinga. Posted 6/7/2013
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